Such was done for various reasons / Images courtesy of Wikipedia
Such was done for various reasons / Images courtesy of Wikipedia

Generally, the most severe punishment for a crime is the death penalty, but what happens when death itself is declared a crime?

It may be hard to believe, but there are parts of the world where authorities have made it illegal for residents to die.

But what is his punishment? In fact, there is no punishment because what punishment can be given to a person who passes away.

But what were the reasons for declaring the death of people illegal in these places and is the ban still there or not?

You will learn about this with details of the places within whose limits permission to die was denied.

Sellia, Italy

A view of Sellia / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
A view of Sellia / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

In August 2015, the mayor of this southern Italian town issued an order that residents were not allowed to get sick and die.

In this town of a few hundred people, most of them are over 65 years of age and according to the mayor, their deaths are the death of the town.

So the main purpose of the ban on their death was to encourage people to keep themselves healthy and a person who does not get a medical check-up every year is fined.

Cugnaux, France

Cugnaux / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
Cugnaux / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Burial of the deceased has become a problem as cemeteries run out of space and groundwater levels rise in this village in southern France.

The site that was available was near a military airbase, and the Ministry of Defense refused to allow burials there, so in 2007 the mayor made it illegal for people to die who do not arrange their burials in advance.

This announcement worked and the Ministry of Defense gave permission to bury people.

Sarpourenx, France

A view of Sarpourenx / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
A view of Sarpourenx / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Inspired by Cugnaux, in 2008 the mayor of this small village in southern France also banned residents from dying.

This was because the cemetery was running out of capacity and the mayor said in his order that violators would be severely punished.

Interestingly, the local court did not allow the mayor to expand the cemetery while also ruling against the order to declare the death illegal, on which the local people also sided with the mayor.

Despite the protests of the mayor and the people to no avail and it is still prohibited to die there.

A person is allowed to die there only if he has already secured a place in the cemetery, otherwise he has to move to another place.

Biritiba-Mirim, Brazil

This ban was also imposed here / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
This ban was also imposed here / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

In 2005, the town’s mayor imposed a mortuary ban when the local cemetery ran out of space.

The mayor enacted the law after the town’s cemetery near Sao Paulo ran out of capacity for 50,000 graves.

The purpose of this law was to protest against the federal government for not allowing the construction of a new cemetery.

As the town is known for agriculture, the construction of a new cemetery was stopped by justifying the environmental laws.

Punishment for violating the law prohibiting death was said, but it was not told what the punishment would be.

By the way, a new cemetery was built there in 2010, so apparently people are allowed to die there now, but for how long is hard to say.

Lanjarón, Spain

It is a town in southern Spain / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
It is a town in southern Spain / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

In the southern Spanish town, in 1999 authorities banned residents from dying until a new cemetery could be found due to lack of space for graves.

The decree asked the residents to take great care of their health so that they could survive until the land for the cemetery was purchased.

What happened after that is not clear, i.e. whether the land was bought or not and whether the law is still in force there, details are not available.

Longyearbyen, Norway

A view of Longyearbyen / AFP Photo
A view of Longyearbyen / AFP Photo

This Norwegian town is home to around 2,000 people and has a cemetery, but it has not been used for decades.

The reason for this is quite surprising.

In 1950 it was revealed that bodies buried in cemeteries were not decomposing.

The climate here is very cold and the snow is usually frozen, leaving bodies buried there unchanged, increasing the risk of spreading deadly germs.

To prevent the spread of germs, euthanasia was banned in the 1950s, and the dying are transported to different parts of Norway.

Itsukushima, Japan

Itsukushima / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
Itsukushima / Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

It is an island off the coast of Hiroshima where a shrine was built in the 8th century and later declared a holy place.

For centuries, people were not even allowed to enter there, but now around 2,000 people live there.

In the late 19th century, dying there was banned and now the dying are moved to nearby islands.

There is no cemetery or hospital in this place.